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12/8/2017
Trends, Causes, and Consequences of Segregation
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Douglas Massey
Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs
Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Friday, December 08, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Douglas S. Massey, PhD is the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Dr. Massey examines the sociology of immigration especially the consequences of residential segregation for African Americans and Latinos of African ancestry in the United States. He has shown that segregation figures prominently in black underachievement that interacts with shifts in the U.S. income distribution to yield a rising concentration of poverty. That poverty intensifies social disorder and violence undermining the health of African Americans reducing their life expectancy and impairing cognitive development.
11/30/2017
CANCELLED-The Role of Education in the Transformation of Health Care
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Sherine Gabriel
Dean, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group

Thursday, November 30, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, MSc was appointed Dean of the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in August, 2015, following her notable leadership in medical education and research as dean of the Mayo Medical School at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Gabriel is recognized for her epidemiologic studies examining the risks of connective tissue diseases among women with breast implants, population-based studies characterizing the epidemiology of major rheumatic diseases and studies defining the economic impact of rheumatoid arthritis. More recently, her research focused on the risks and determinants of heart disease among persons with rheumatoid arthritis. She has served on several governmental committees and advisory boards including the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Committee and the methodology committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) created by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 serving as the committee’s first chair.
11/16/2017
Evaluation of the New Jersey Medicaid Comprehensive Waiver Demonstration: Identification Strategies and Early Findings
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Sujoy Chakravarty
Assistant Research Professor
Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University

Thursday, November 16, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Sujoy Chakravarty, PhD is a Health Economist whose research examines the impact of state and federal policies relating to healthcare delivery and financing on patient access, efficiency and quality of care. He also studies hospital markets focusing on the impact of changes in market structure, competition and ownership mix on provider behavior and patient care. His recent research includes identifying hospital utilization patterns that indicate gaps in patient care; examining the effect of Medicare Part D prescription drug policy on coverage and access with focus on racial disparities in access; and assessing and evaluating care management initiatives for patients with complex conditions who have high hospital utilization. He is currently leading the evaluation of the New Jersey Medicaid Comprehensive Waiver Demonstration that introduces significant changes in delivery of behavioral health services, long-term services and supports, and hospital payment structure aimed at improving patient care and population health.
11/9/2017
Moving On Initiatives: Opening the Pipeline in Homeless Services for Populations with Complex Needs
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Emmy Tiderington
Assistant Professor, School of Social Work Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Thursday, November 09, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Emmy Tiderington, PhD, MSW, LMSW is Assistant Professor in the Rutgers School of Social Work and Associate Member of the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. Her research focuses on the implementation and effectiveness of supportive housing and other forms of homeless services as a means for ending homelessness and improving outcomes for service recipients. She examines the individual, organizational and macro-systemic barriers to “street-level” policy implementation of person-centered care, harm reduction and management of risk and recovery in supportive housing. She is conducting a three-year study of the implementation and outcomes of the New York City Moving On Initiative, a model that utilizes rental subsidies and transitional supports to assist individuals and families to move from supportive housing to mainstream housing independent of wrap-around support services.
11/7/2017
Perceptions of Safety in Urban Environments: Approaches to identifying important environmental features of safe and unsafe places for violence prevention research.
CHHS Research Seminar Series

Bernadette Hohl
PhD, MPH
Rutgers School of Public Health and School of Criminal Justice

Tuesday, November 07, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:00 pm
Institute Conference Room 120
In the United States, homicide is the third leading cause of death for people ages 15-34 and the leading cause of death for African-American males of the same age. Each year, young people make nearly one million visits to the hospital for non-fatal, assault related injuries. Despite a consistent decline in violent crimes over the last few decades, disproportionate rates of violence persist in US cities and young men of color continue to die at rates that are more than 20 times their white counterparts. We know that violence is distributed in patterns of time and space and that each day, youth navigate urban environments that could place them at very high risk for violence. Research has indicated that social and physical neighborhood characteristics are important risk factors for youth violence and warrant further investigation as possible modifiable features that could inform violence prevention efforts. This presentation will include a series of pilot studies conducted in an urban context using novel methodologies to learn more about micro-spatial indicators of safety and inform future place-based violence prevention studies.
11/2/2017
Using Medicaid Claims to Study Health-Related Outcomes among Low Income New Yorkers: Overview of NYU’s Medicaid Claims Research and Recent Findings
Brown Bag Seminar Series

James R. Knickman
President and Chief Executive Officer
New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth)

Thursday, November 02, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
James R. Knickman, PhD is the Derzon Chair in Public and Health Affairs at the NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Clinical Professor, Department of Population Health in the Langone School of Medicine. Dr. Knickman serves as Director of the Health Analytics and Evaluation Program (HAEP), a joint initiative of the Wagner Health Policy and Management Program and NYU’s School of Medicine. Under his leadership HAEP conducts research on health service delivery, population health, and health and social policy innovations. HAEP maintains patient-level New York State all-payer and Medicaid fee-for-service claims and managed care encounter data, allowing rapid-cycle analyses of Medicaid and other program interventions by providers and public agencies. Dr. Knickman was previously President and CEO of the New York State Health Foundation and prior to that appointment, Vice President for Research and Evaluation at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
10/26/2017
Nudges toward Temperance: Reducing the Prevalence of Substance Use Disorder for Legalized Drugs
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Mark Kleiman
Professor of Public Policy, NYU/Marron Institute of Urban Management

Thursday, October 26, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Mark A.R. Kleiman, MPP, PhD is Professor of Public Policy and the Director of the Crime Reduction and Justice Initiative at New York University’s Marron Institute of Urban Management. Dr. Kleiman is a world-renowned expert in crime reduction, justice and drug policy. His recent work includes methods for accommodating imperfect rational decision-making in policy, designing deterrent regimes that take advantage of positive-feedback effects and the substitution of swiftness and predictability for severity in the criminal justice system. Dr. Kleiman advises local, state, national, and international governmental bodies on crime control and drug policy. He is chairman of BOTEC Analysis Corporation, a research and consulting firm that focuses on criminal justice reform, drug abuse control, and urban development. Dr. Kleiman is a member of the Committee on Law and Justice of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine and editor of the Journal of Drug Policy Analysis.
10/12/2017
What are the Most Unforgivable Problems in the U.S. Health Care System?
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Joseph White
Luxenberg Family Professor of Public Policy Director of the Center for Policy Studies Department of Political Science Case Western Reserve University

Thursday, October 12, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Joseph White, PhD is Luxenberg Family Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Center for Policy Studies in the Department of Political Science at Case Western Reserve University. His research can be divided into five related categories: budget politics and policy within the United States, comparisons of health care policies across advanced industrial democracies, politics of health care reform in the United States, health care cost control, and Social Security and Medicare policy and politics. Dr. White’s focus in this talk is partly a matter of ethics (is excessive care at the end of life all that important compared to all the people who don't get care? What about excessive transfers of income from the sick to providers of care?). Another issue is prioritizing problems based on the likelihood of a solution (it's harder to forgive failures to fix things that we know how to fix). Posing the question about comparative ethics or problem selection can lead to further questions, such as what's so terrible about variations; how should we think about inequalities in health as opposed to health care?
10/5/2017
Inside the Black Box: Fixing Medical Prices
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Miriam Laugesen
Assistant Professor of Health Policy Management
Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Thursday, October 05, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Miriam Laugesen, PhD is Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management in the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. She is a political scientist and health policy/health services researcher and author of Fixing Medical Prices: How Physicians are Paid that goes to the heart of the U.S. medical pricing process- a largely unknown, yet influential committee of medical organizations affiliated with the American Medical Association that advises Medicare. The ready acceptance of this committees’ recommendations typically sets off a chain reaction across the entire American health care system. She has authored and co-authored over 30 book chapters and journal articles on state and local public health policies, public opinion, public health insurance coverage expansions and health insurance benefit regulation. Dr. Laugesen is a past recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Investigator Award in Health Policy Research.
10/3/2017
Examination of a Managed Care Organization’s Multi-tiered Approach to Improve Quality of Antipsychotic Medication Use among Children in Foster Care: How Can We Improve Analyses of Our Quasi-Experimental Study Design?
CHHS Research Seminar Series

Thomas Mackie
Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine, Tufts University

Tuesday, October 03, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Institute Conference Room 120
Managed care penetration among state Medicaid programs grew from 55% in 1999 to 75% in 2015. Vulnerable medically-complex sub-populations -- traditionally enrolled in Fee-for-Service (FFS)—are increasingly enrolled in managed care organizations (MCOs). One of the nation’s first statewide specialized managed care programs for children in foster care emerged in Texas in 2008 where specific efforts were made to address concerns around safe and judicious use of antipsychotic medications (APMs). As part of three-year Patient-Centered Outcome Research Institute (PCORI) study, Dr. Mackie and co-authors (Dr. Ayse Akincigil, Dr. Stephen Crystal, Dr. Scott Bilder, and Ms. Sharon Cook) examine the impact of the MCO on APM utilization among children in foster care. After controlling for secular trends among the general Medicaid population within the state, children in foster care experienced a 2.6 and 2.9 percentage decrease in the proportion of enrollees who had any antipsychotic medication use and continuous use for 90 days or more, respectively. Effects of the MCO multi-tiered approach were strongest for children with disorders for which APM use presents potential quality concerns (e.g., attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, etc.) as opposed to those conditions for which APM use is FDA-indicated (e.g., autism, bipolar disorder). The presentation will explore the recurrent challenge of how to identify an optimal comparison group in state natural experiments. As this will be presented as a working paper, specific discussion will be encouraged to address concerns of selection bias in current analyses and opportunities for integration of patient-prioritized outcomes.
9/13/2017
Multivariate Matching to Assess Healthcare Quality, Cost and Value
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Jeffrey Silber
Nancy Abramson Wolfson Professor of Health Services Research; Director, Center for Outcomes Research, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia;
Professor of Pediatrics, Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine; Professor of Health Care Management, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

Wednesday, September 13, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Jeffrey H. Silber, MD, PhD holds the Nancy Abramson Wolfson Endowed Chair in Health Services Research and is Director of the Multidisciplinary Center for Outcomes Research at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and is a Professor of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine and Professor of Health Care Management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Silber is an internationally known authority on outcomes measurement and severity adjustment for both adults and children. He created the adult quality of care measure, Failure-to-Rescue (FTR) in 1990 that has been adopted as three specific quality measures by the National Quality Forum (NQF). He has developed two length of stay outcome measures: Prolonged Length of Stay and Conditional Length of Stay, now applied to both pediatric and adult populations. With Paul Rosenbaum he developed the Omega measure that evaluates outcome measures by estimating the relative contribution of patient to hospital characteristics associated with a specific outcome and the method of Template Matching to compare hospital cost and quality. Much of his recent work focuses on the use of multivariate matching when comparing outcomes, specifically to problems in both pediatric and adult medicine and surgery, disparities, and cancer.
6/6/2017
Timeliness of Care for New Jersey Medicaid Patients Diagnosed with Cancer
CHHS Research Seminar Series

Jennifer Tsui
Assistant Professor
IHHCPAR and CINJ, Rutgers University

Tuesday, June 06, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Institute Conference Room 120
Using linked New Jersey State Cancer Registry and Medicaid claims data, preliminary analyses of the relationship between patient demographic, clinical, area-based factors, and Medicaid enrollment characteristics on the likelihood of cancer treatment delays will be presented. Variation in hospital characteristics, obtained from American Hospital Association data, for place of treatment will also be discussed.

Jennifer Tsui, PhD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology, Section of Population Science at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Her research focuses on health care system factors and geospatial influences related to disparities in cancer care and cancer outcomes for minority, low-income, and underserved populations. She collaborates with investigators at the New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Institute for Health’s Center for State Health Policy, School of Public Health, and Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy. Her recent work uses Medicare, Medicaid and other claims data to examine disparities in access to cancer treatment and quality of cancer care for minority populations. Her prior work examined HPV vaccine introduction and barriers to uptake in low-income minority communities and disparities in cancer screening among racial/ethnic minority populations
5/4/2017
PEDSnet: A National Pediatric Learning Health System
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Christopher Forrest
Professor of Pediatrics and Health Care Management
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).

Thursday, May 04, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Dr. Forrest is Professor of Pediatrics and Health Care Management at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. He is the Director of the CHOP Applied Clinical Research Center, which is devoted to advancing multi-institutional clinical and health services research in routine pediatric healthcare settings. Forrest serves as the Principal Investigator of the PEDSnet (pedsnet.org), a national consortium of children’s hospitals (>5 million children) that conducts patient-centered outcomes research among children and youth. He is the Chair of the Research Committee for PCORnet, the national clinical research network funded by PCORI. He also chairs the Steering Committee for the NIH program called PEPR, which evaluates patient-reported outcome measures for children with chronic conditions. Dr. Forrest received his BA and MD degrees from Boston University and completed his PhD in Health Policy and Management at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.
4/27/2017
Access to Unapproved Drugs for the Desperately Ill- Ethical Challenges and Possible Solutions
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Arthur Caplan
Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and founding director of the Division of Medical Ethics
Langone Medical Center, New York University

Thursday, April 27, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Arthur L. Caplan, PhD is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and Founding Director of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center. Dr. Caplan well known to colleagues and the public for his work on moral issues inherent to biomedical endeavors including clinical trials, organ donations, blood safety, equitable distribution of experimental drugs, compassionate care and gene therapy. He has long been an advocate of disclosures to patients about the risks and benefits of participating in studies of new drugs and has encouraged physicians to disclose the financial benefits they receive from drug and medical-device makers. His contributions to public policy are noteworthy including helping to found the National Marrow Donor Program. He secured the first apology for the Tuskegee Syphilis Study from the secretary of HHS in 1991. Criticism about his “hands-on-philosophy” and enthusiastic engagement with the media prompts him to respond, “To me, the whole point of doing ethics is to change people, to change behavior. Why else do it?”
4/20/2017
Health Care Reform and the Healthcare Delivery System: What Types of Medical Groups Provide Better Health Care?
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Lawrence P. Casalino
Livingston Farrand Professor of Public Health
Weill Cornell Medical College

Thursday, April 20, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Lawrence P. Casalino MD, PhD is Livingston Farrand Professor of Public Health and Chief, Division of Health Policy and Economics in the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical College. Dr. Casalino conducts comparative effectiveness research across the health care delivery system identifying unintended consequences of policies and how the organization of practice affects physician professionalism and racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in health care delivery. He works on projects that define the demography of physician practices in the U.S. and the kinds of organized processes physicians use to improve quality of care and control costs. His background includes 20 years as a family physician in private practice.
4/6/2017
Strategic Science for Evidence-based Food Policy
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Christina Roberto
Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics & Health Policy
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Thursday, April 06, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Christina A. Roberto, PhD is Assistant Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Roberto is a clinical psychologist and epidemiologist and principal investigator of the Psychology of Eating And Consumer Health (PEACH) lab. Her research focuses on identifying and understanding factors that promote unhealthy eating behaviors linked to obesity and eating disorders and designing interventions to promote healthy eating. In her work, she draws upon the fields of psychology, marketing, behavioral economics, epidemiology, and public health to answer research questions that provide policymakers and institutions with science-based guidance.
4/4/2017
Hospital Adjustments and Provision of Uncompensated Care: Does Ownership make a Difference?
CHHS Research Seminar Series

Sujoy Chakravarty
Assistant Research Professor
Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University

Tuesday, April 04, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Institute Conference Room 120
Using hospital and county-level information from California over 1995-2010, we compare provision of uncompensated care by for-profit (FP) hospitals to not-for-profit (NFP) hospitals after accounting for differences in long run market demand and profitability conditions. Our research strategy utilizes a conceptual model where output preference of NFP hospitals results in their continuing to operate in unprofitable markets which a comparable FP hospital would have exited. Legislative oversight of NFP provision of uncompensated care should take such factors into account.

Sujoy Chakravarty, PhD is Assistant Research Professor at the Institute for Health’s Center for State Health Policy where his primary emphasis centers on health economics and policy. Dr. Chakravarty examines the impact of state and federal health care policies on patient access, efficiency and quality of care. His studies of hospital markets focus on how changes in market structure, competition and ownership mix impact provider behavior and patient care. Recent research includes identifying hospital utilization patterns showing gaps in patient care that inform implementation of New Jersey’s Medicaid ACO Demonstration program. He is evaluating care management initiatives for high utilizing patients with complex conditions. He leads the evaluation of the New Jersey Comprehensive Waiver Demonstration that introduces significant changes in delivery of behavioral health services, long-term services, and hospital payment structure to improve care and population health.
3/30/2017
Cancer Incidence and Patterns of Cancer Care in the New Jersey Medicaid Population
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Jennifer Tsui
Assistant Professor
IHHCPAR and CINJ, Rutgers University

Thursday, March 30, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Jennifer Tsui, PhD, MPH is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Medical Oncology, Section of Population Science at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the Cancer Institute of New Jersey. Her research focuses on health care system factors and geospatial influences related to disparities in cancer care and cancer outcomes for minority, low-income, and underserved populations. She collaborates with investigators at the New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Institute for Health’s Center for State Health Policy, School of Public Health, and Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy. Her recent work uses Medicare, Medicaid and other claims data to examine disparities in access to cancer treatment and quality of cancer care for minority populations. Her prior work examined HPV vaccine introduction and barriers to uptake in low-income minority communities and disparities in cancer screening among racial/ethnic minority populations
3/23/2017
** CANCELLED ** ** CANCELLED ** ** CANCELLED ** The Role of Education in the Transformation of Healthcare
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Sherine Gabriel
Dean, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School CEO, Robert Wood Johnson Medical Group

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Sherine E. Gabriel, MD, MSc was appointed Dean of the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in August, 2015, following her notable leadership in medical education and research as dean of the Mayo Medical School at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Gabriel is recognized for her epidemiologic studies examining the risks of connective tissue diseases among women with breast implants, population-based studies characterizing the epidemiology of major rheumatic diseases and studies defining the economic impact of rheumatoid arthritis. More recently, her research focused on the risks and determinants of heart disease among persons with rheumatoid arthritis. She has served on several governmental committees and advisory boards including the FDA Drug Safety and Risk Management Committee and the methodology committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) created by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 serving as the committee’s first chair.
3/14/2017
** POSTPONED DUE TO WEATHER ** How do Economic Shocks Affect Family Mental Health Spending?
CHHS Research Seminar Series

Irina Grafova
Assistant Professor, Department of Health Systems and Policy
School of Public Health

Tuesday, March 14, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
Institute Conference Room 120
Using two-year panel data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the period 2004 to 2012, we examine the effect of economic shocks on mental health spending by families with children. Estimating two-part expenditure models within the correlated random effects framework, we find that employment shocks have a greater impact on mental health spending than do income or health insurance shocks. Our estimates reveal that employment gains are associated with a lower likelihood of family mental health services utilization. By contrast employment losses are associated with a higher likelihood of family mental health services utilization as well as increased mental health spending. Our results also indicate that mental health spending on children is largely unaffected by economic shocks.
3/2/2017
** CANCELLED. WILL RESCHEDULE IN FALL, 2017 ** Inquiry into Intents and Effects of Medicaid Reforms in New Jersey: Early Findings from the Evaluation of the Medicaid Comprehensive Waiver
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Sujoy Chakravarty
Assistant Research Professor
Center for State Health Policy, Rutgers University

Thursday, March 02, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Sujoy Chakravarty, PhD is Assistant Research Professor at the Institute for Health’s Center for State Health Policy where his primary emphasis centers on health economics and policy. Dr. Chakravarty examines the impact of state and federal health care policies on patient access, efficiency and quality of care. His studies of hospital markets focus on how changes in market structure, competition and ownership mix impact provider behavior and patient care. Recent research includes identifying hospital utilization patterns showing gaps in patient care that inform implementation of New Jersey’s Medicaid ACO Demonstration program. He is evaluating care management initiatives for high utilizing patients with complex conditions. He leads the evaluation of the New Jersey Comprehensive Waiver Demonstration that introduces significant changes in delivery of behavioral health services, long-term services, and hospital payment structure to improve care and population health.
2/22/2017
Health Care and Population Health: Parallel or Converging
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Marc Gourevitch
Muriel G. and George W. Singer Professor
NYU School of Medicine

Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Marc N. Gourevitch, MD, MPH, is the Muriel G. and George W. Singer Professor and founding Chair, Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center. The focus of Dr. Gourevitch's work is on developing approaches that leverage both healthcare delivery and policy- and community-level interventions to advance the health of populations. Dr. Gourevitch leads initiatives in urban health metrics, is co-Director of the Community Engagement and Population Health Research Core of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute that bridges NYU Langone and NYC Health+Hospitals, and leads NYU Langone’s participation in the NYC Clinical Data Research Network funded by PCORI. His research centers on improving health outcomes among drug users and other underserved populations, integrating pharmacologic treatments for opioid and alcohol dependence into primary care and developing strategies for bridging academic research with applied challenges faced by health care delivery systems and public sector initiatives.
2/16/2017
Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital
Brown Bag Seminar Series

David Oshinsky
Professor
Department of History, New York University

Thursday, February 16, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
David Oshinsky, PhD, Director of the Division of Medical Humanities at the NYU School of Medicine and Professor of History at New York University, is an historian whose research focuses on the history of medicine and public health. His recently released book, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital, as noted in the NYT Books of the Times is “as much about the history of disease, medicine and New York City as about the hospital itself.” His earlier book, Polio: An American Story, won both the Pulitzer Prize in History and the Hoover Presidential Book Award. His other books include A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy that won the Hardeman Prize for the best book about the U.S. Congress, and Worse Than Slavery, awarded the Robert F. Kennedy Prize for distinguished contribution to human rights.
2/9/2017
** CANCELED due to weather ** Trends, Causes, and Consequences of Segregation
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Douglas Massey
Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs
Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University

Thursday, February 09, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Douglas S. Massey, PhD, is the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Dr. Massey examines the sociology of immigration especially the consequences of residential segregation for African Americans and Latinos of African ancestry in the United States. He has shown that segregation figures prominently in black underachievement that interacts with shifts in the U.S. income distribution to yield a rising concentration of poverty. That poverty intensifies social disorder and violence undermining the health of African Americans reducing their life expectancy and impairing cognitive development.
1/26/2017
Including Health Insurance in Poverty Measurement: Accounting for the Impact of Health Insurance on Poverty Under the ACA
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Sanders D. Korenman
Professor
Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Baruch College

Dahlia Remler
Professor
Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Baruch College

Thursday, January 26, 2017, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Sanders Korenman, PhD, is Professor in the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs in Baruch Collge at CUNY. He served as Senior Economist for labor, welfare and education for President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisers and was a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Academy of Sciences. He is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Dahlia Remler, PhD, DPhil, is Professor in the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs in Baruch College at CUNY and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She has published widely in health care policy, including cost containment, information technology, cigarette tax regressivity, simulation methods for health insurance take-up and health insurance and health care markets.

Their recent article in the Journal of Health Economics (December 2016) showed that public health insurance benefits and premium subsidies accounted for a substantial, one-third reduction in the poverty rate. The results were seen as novel because other poverty measures do not value health insurance in resources and needs.
12/1/2016
Getting Creative, Bending the Rules, Kicking the Problem: Workaround Behaviors and the Clinical Management of Health Policy
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Nancy Berlinger
Research Scholar
The Hastings Center

Thursday, December 01, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Nancy Berlinger, PhD is a Research Scholar at The Hastings Center where she focuses on ethical challenges in health care work and related areas of professional education and health policy in the United States and internationally. Her special interests include treatment decision-making and care near the end of life; ethical issues in the management of chronic illnesses including cancer; access to health care for undocumented immigrants and migrant workers; and the ethics of workarounds and other practices for managing problems of safety and harm in health care systems. She frequently serves on public policy initiatives related to her research including the bioethics committee of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Initiative on Cancer Diagnostics in Sub-Saharan Africa; ActionHealthNYC Community Advisory Panel, City of New York; and Care and Coverage Subgroup of the New York City Mayor’s Task Force on Immigrant Health Access. Her recent book is Are Workarounds Ethical? Managing Moral Problems in Health Care.
11/17/2016
The Patient-as-Watchdog: the 'Educated Consumer' in Health Care Policy
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Nancy Tomes
Distinguished Professor, Department of History
Stony Brook University

Thursday, November 17, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Nancy Tomes, PhD is Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at Stony Brook University. Her research interests focus on the history of medicine, U.S. social and cultural history, women and gender, organization of care, advertising, consumerism and media and health. While a fellow at the National Humanities Center, she developed Medicine and Madison Avenue, a digital collection on the history of health-related advertising including over 400 advertisements with medical and health-related themes published between 1910 and 1960. Her book The Gospel of Germs: Men, Women, and the Microbe in American Life was winner of the 2002 Welch Medal from the American Association for the History of Medicine among other awards. Her recent book, Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers examines how the history of the coevolution of medicine and the consumer culture tells us much about our current predicament about health care in the United States.
11/10/2016
The Politics of Evidence
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Michael K. Gusmano
Associate Professor
Department of Health Systems & Policy, Rutgers School of Public Health

Thursday, November 10, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Michael K. Gusmano, PhD is an Associate Professor of Health Policy in Rutgers School of Public Health and research scholar at the Hastings Center. Dr. Gusmano investigates health care equity in the U.S. and other countries focusing on health policy, aging, and comparative welfare state analysis. He is co-director of the World Cities Project, the first effort to compare the performance of health, social, and long-term care systems in New York, London, Paris and Tokyo. He is an investigator on “The Role of Values in Impact Assessment” and “Care Transitions in Aging Societies”, a Singapore-based project that is producing an online casebook on ethical challenges of caring for people in an aging society. He is co-director of the “Undocumented Patients” project to improve access to health care for undocumented immigrants. His seminar will include case studies from his new book with Karen Maschke, a Hastings Center research scholar,that explores how ideology and interest groups shape debates about health technology assessment.
11/9/2016
An Implementation Science Journey: A Ten-Year Partnership in Improving Metabolic Monitoring for Persons with Serious Mental Illness
Visiting Speaker

Elaine Morrato
Associate Dean for Public Health Practice and Associate Professor in the Department of Health Systems, Management and Policy
Colorado School of Public Health

Wednesday, November 09, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 3rd floor conference room
Trained as an epidemiologist and board-certified in public health, Elaine Morrato's research focuses on accelerating the translation of medical innovation and drug warnings into clinical practice. She directs the Pragmatic Trials and Dissemination and Implementation Research core and the Innovation-Corps training program for commercialization in the Colorado Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute supported by NIH/NCATS. Her 15-year tenure at Procter & Gamble launching new drugs and indications informs her implementation research and practice. Implementation involves an iterative, life-cycle approach. Given the complexity of health systems, promoting the large-scale adoption of evidence-based recommendations necessitates partnerships between medicine and public health. A 10-year academic partnership with Missouri Medicaid and the Department of Mental Health will be used to illustrate the practical application of implementation science to the problem of promoting metabolic monitoring for patients with mental illness taking antipsychotics. Mixed-methods strategies and findings from physician survey, market data, administrative claims, and clinical records will be presented. Implications for advancing implementation science and practice will be discussed.
11/3/2016
Quantifying Disparities in Medicaid Expenditures for Mental Health Services among Vulnerable Children
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Ramesh Raghavan
Professor and Associate Dean for Research
IHHCPAR and School of Social Work, Rutgers University

Thursday, November 03, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Ramesh Raghavan, MD, PhD is Professor and Associate Dean for Research at the Rutgers School of Social Work. Dr. Raghavan conducts mental health services research on the needs of vulnerable children with a specific interest in children in the child welfare system. Dr. Raghavan has conducted studies on Medicaid managed care and on the effects of health insurance instability on mental health service use. He has conducted several studies on quality of care including the use of public finance mechanisms to promote quality of mental health services, analyze racial/ethnic disparities in Medicaid-funded mental health expenditures for children with histories of maltreatment and the development of novel risk adjustment mechanisms to better insure the mental health needs of children with emotional disorders. In early 2015, he served as Senior Advisor in the Office of the Commissioner, Administration on Children, Youth and Families in the US Department of Health and Human Services, working primarily on the Obama Administration’s psychotropic medication use and childhood trauma initiatives.
10/27/2016
Precision Medicine: Better Outcomes and Healthier Individuals
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Reynold Panettieri
Inaugural Director of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Rutgers University

Thursday, October 27, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Reynold A. Panettieri, Jr, MD is RBHS Vice Chancellor for clinical and translational research and the inaugural director of the RBHS Clinical and Translational Science Institute. A pulmonologist, immunologist, and translational researcher, his research interests are in the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate airway smooth muscle cell growth and the immunobiology of airway smooth muscle. Since joining Rutgers, his responsibilities have included developing and implementing a clinical and translational science infrastructure and leading initiatives to expand independent clinical research funding with a goal of achieving a coveted clinical and translational research award from the National Institutes of Health and then leading the CTSA program as its PI. A major focus of Dr. Panettieri’s research has been understanding the molecular makeup of disease and illnesses and becoming more precise in prescribing medications and therapies that treat the right diseases.
10/20/2016
Effects of the ACA on Health Insurance and Labor Supply among Older Americans
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Helen Levy
Research Associate Professor, Department of Health Policy and the Institute for Social Research
Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan

Thursday, October 20, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Helen G. Levy is Research Associate Professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. As a current visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation, she is evaluating the economic consequences of health care reform by comparing outcomes in states that have expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act with outcomes in those that did not. She is analyzing the impact of Medicaid expansions on food insecurity and participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) (formerly food stamps) among low-income individuals. She is examining changes in employment trends in the health care sector and analyzing the demographic characteristics of health care workers potentially affected by Medicaid expansions. She is a co-Investigator on the Health and Retirement Study, a long-running longitudinal study of health and economic dynamics at older ages.
10/13/2016
Reflections on Medicare, Obamacare, and the Use and Misuse of Cross-national Evidence in Health Policy Disputes
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Theodore Marmor
Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and Political Science
Yale University

Thursday, October 13, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Theodore R. Marmor, PhD is Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and Management and Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Yale University. For three decades he taught in Yale’s School of Management, Department of Political Science and the Law School. Professor Marmor is primarily a scholar of modern welfare state politics and policy in North America and Western Europe with special emphasis on health and pension issues. He is the author or co-author of thirteen books and has published over 200 articles in a wide range of scholarly journals. He began his public career as a special assistant to Wilbur Cohen, Secretary of HEW in the mid-1960s, was a member of President Carter’s Commission in the National Agenda for 1980s, and a senior social policy advisor to Walter Mondale in the Presidential campaign of 1984. He continues to improve our understanding of the dynamics of health care policymaking and offering more informed options for policymakers.
10/6/2016
Stress, Coping and Population Health
Brown Bag Seminar Series

James Jackson
Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, and Director of the Institute for Social Research
University of Michigan

Thursday, October 06, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
James S. Jackson, PhD is Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology and former Director of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. For more than three decades Professor Jackson has advanced scholarship about race and ethnic relations, immigration, disparities in physical and mental health, aging, and African-American politics. His research focuses on issues of racial and ethnic influences on life course development, attitude change, reciprocity, social support, coping and health among African Americans. He has directed the most extensive surveys ever on social and political behavior and mental and physical health of African American and Black Caribbean populations in “The National Survey of American Life”, “The Family Survey across Generations and Nations”, and “National Study of Ethnic Pluralism and Politics”. For the current year he is a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation conducting research on population disparities in physical and mental health, examining how interactions among environmental factors, chronic stressors (such as poverty and crime), and physiological and hormonal responses, contribute to poor health outcomes for African Americans.
9/29/2016
Communicating Science with Patients, Providers and Policy Makers: the Role of Narratives and Storytelling
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Zachary Meisel
Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine
Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

Thursday, September 29, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Zachary F. Meisel, MD, MPH, MSHP is Assistant Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Senior Fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. Dr. Meisel’s research focuses on how people decide to use emergency care resources including ambulance care. He conducts comparative effectiveness research in emergency care and knowledge translation related to opioid prescription guidelines and research evidence. He directs the Policy and Dissemination core for the NIDA-funded Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorder, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV. He has brought attention to how written narratives can be used to improve how patients, doctors and policymakers make decisions about health especially during medical emergencies.
9/22/2016
** CANCELED ** ** CANCELED ** ** CANCELED ** Access to Unapproved Drugs for the Desperately Ill- Ethical Challenges and Possible Solutions
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Arthur Caplan
Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and founding director of the Division of Medical Ethics
Langone Medical Center, New York University

Thursday, September 22, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Arthur L. Caplan, PhD is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and Founding Director of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center. Dr. Caplan is well known to colleagues and the public for his work on moral issues inherent to biomedical endeavors including clinical trials, organ donations, blood safety, equitable distribution of experimental drugs, compassionate care and gene therapy. He has long been an advocate of disclosures to patients about the risks and benefits of participating in studies of new drugs and has encouraged physicians to disclose the financial benefits they receive from drug and medical-device makers. His contributions to public policy are noteworthy including helping to found the National Marrow Donor Program. He secured the first apology for the Tuskegee Syphilis Study from the secretary of HHS in 1991. Criticism about his “hands-on-philosophy” and enthusiastic engagement with the media prompts him to respond, “To me, the whole point of doing ethics is to change people, to change behavior. Why else do it?”
9/21/2016
Implementing Mental Health Reform in Israel: Promises and Pitfalls in Efforts to Integrate Mental Health Services into the General Health Care System
Visiting Speaker

Uri Aviram
Zena Harman Professor Emeritus of Social Work, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Dean of the School of Social and Community Services, Ruppin Academic Center

Wednesday, September 21, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Uri Aviram, PhD is Zena Harman Professor Emeritus of Social Work at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Recently he designed and established the social work program at Ruppin Academic Center where currently he serves as Dean of the School of Social and Community Sciences. The focus of his academic work has been mental health services research, policy studies and social work education. Lately he has conducted research on mental health reforms, the interface between psychiatry and law and social work education. Uri was formerly a faculty member of the Institute for Health and the School of Social Work and has had several visiting university appointments including those at Case Western Reserve, Berkeley, Cornell and the University of Melbourne. In 2015 he was awarded by ESPAnet-Israel for lifelong contributions to the study of social policy in Israel.
4/14/2016
Negotiation of Psychiatric Medication Decisions in the Era of Patient-Centered Medicine
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Beth Angell
Associate Professor
School of Social Work, Rutgers University

Galina Bolden
Associate Professor
School of Communication and Information, Rutgers University

Thursday, April 14, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Beth Angell, associate professor in the School of Social Work and Core Faculty at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research conducts research on mental health services for people with serious mental illnesses especially their engagement in and adherence to treatment. Dr. Angell’s studies examine how legal and informal strategies, consumer-provider relationships and consumer self-determination promote treatment adherence. She is evaluating New Jersey’s Involuntary Outpatient Commitment law; reentry for former prisoners with serious mental illness; conversation analytic study of client-provider communication about medication management; and impact of a state psychiatric hospital closure on the lives of those discharged to the community.

Galina Bolden, associate professor in the School of Communication and Information, examines naturally occurring, video/audio-recorded social interactions in various settings: ordinary conversations between family and friends, doctor-patient interactions conducted with the help of language interpreters, conversations among co-workers at workplaces and interactions between psychiatrists and people with mental illnesses. Using conversation analysis to research talk in Russian and English languages, Dr. Bolden examines how members of different cultural and language communities pursue mutual understanding and construct interpersonal relationships through social interaction.
4/7/2016
Thinking Wisely about Choosing Wisely: What Americans Understand About 'Low-Value Care' and How That Might Be Enriched
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Mark Schlesinger
Professor of Health Policy
School of Public Health, Yale University

Thursday, April 07, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Mark Schlesinger is Professor of Health Policy and a fellow of the Institution for Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. Dr. Schlesinger’s research explores the determinants of public opinion about health and social policy, the influence of bounded rationality on medical consumers and the role of nonprofit organizations in American medicine. His recent research initiatives include studying how the changing availability of information on clinicians’ practices alters patients’ choices among doctors, assessing public perceptions of and responses to economic insecurity, explaining the recent rapid expansion in the scope of newborn screening among American states and understanding why particular collective responses are seen as more or less legitimate for addressing the spread of obesity among Americans.
3/31/2016
How Much Do Health Insurance Exchange Consumers Save on Their Premium When They Purchase a Narrow Network Plan?
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Daniel Polsky
Professor of Medicine and Executive Director
Perelman School of Medicine and Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Wharton School

Thursday, March 31, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Daniel Polsky is Executive Director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, Professor of Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine and the Robert D. Eilers Professor of Health Care Management and Economics in the Wharton School. As a health policy expert, his research areas include access to health care, economics of the physician workforce, economic evaluation of medical and behavioral health interventions and outcomes of the Affordable Care Act. Currently he serves on the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Health Advisers and the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. He was the Senior Economist on health issues at the President's Council of Economic Advisers in 2007-08.
3/3/2016
Exercise as A Neurobehavioral Intervention for Cognitive Dysfunction in Depression
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Brandon Alderman
Assistant Professor
Department of Exercise Science and Sport Studies, Rutgers University

Thursday, March 03, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Brandon Alderman is assistant professor in the Department of Exercise Science and Sport Studies at Rutgers University. Using advanced psychophysiological techniques including impedance cardiography and electroencephalography, his laboratory investigates the effects of exercise on neurocognitive and physiological resilience. Ongoing projects include establishing the potential efficacy of acute and chronic exercise for attenuating cardiovascular responses and increasing heart rate variability during acute laboratory stressors. This work has elucidated mechanisms underlying the effects of exercise on mental health states (e.g., anxiety, depression, cognitive functioning). His laboratory is also evaluating the role of exercise in modulating cardiorespiratory function and neurocognitive function.
2/25/2016
Opportunities for Partnership to Improve Maternal and Child Health in NJ
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Mary O'Dowd
Former Commissioner
New Jersey Department of Health

Thursday, February 25, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
The Honorable Mary O’Dowd served as New Jersey’s Commissioner of Health from 2011- 2015. Among the major issues during her four year tenure including her leading the health response to Hurricane Sandy, launching the Delivery System Reform Incentive Program (DSRIP), handling Ebola cases, improving the state’s health information technology, expansion of the state’s medical marijuana program, and initiating conversations about how patients want to be treated at the end of their lives, was her focus on improving birth outcomes and maternal and infant health. Her efforts contributed to a higher breast feeding rate, lower induced-labor delivery rates and increased coordination with other state departments in delivering services to Medicaid recipients. As she left office with several efforts she initiated still underway including the campaign to improve birth outcomes, she stated “There’s a lot of opportunity, and I’m hopeful that the momentum will continue. Ms. O’Dowd is a graduate of Douglass College.
2/18/2016
** Co-sponsored by the Department of Sociology ** The Social Standing of Occupations in the United States, 1989-2012: Fitting 200 New Occupations into the Prestige Order
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Michael Hout
Professor of Sociology and Director, Center for Advanced Social Science Research
New York University

Thursday, February 18, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Michael Hout, PhD is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Center for Advanced Social Science Research at New York University. Professor Hout uses demographic methods to study social change in inequality, religion, and politics. His current work uses the General Social Survey (GSS) panel to study Americans' changing perceptions of class, religion, and their place in society. He (along with Tom W. Smith and Peter V. Marsden) have used the GSS to estimate the social standing of occupations introduced into the census classification since 1990. Their research shows how the dynamic U.S. economy gave rise to new occupations with innovations in the life sciences, information technology and financial services. The scales for scoring occupations that were developed are important in outcomes including health, happiness, and social attitudes.
2/11/2016
Who Wants to Know? Refining Questions on Place and Health through Local Engagement
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Gina Lovasi
Assistant Professor
Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Thursday, February 11, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Gina S. Lovasi, MPH, PhD is assistant professor in Epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Her research examines how local policies and initiatives influence cardiovascular and respiratory health to understand whether anticipated health benefits have been realized and the presence of unanticipated health effects. She incorporates GIS into health-related research projects in vulnerable populations. Key measures of the local environment include walkable urban form, sources of healthy and unhealthy foods, tree canopy coverage, other aesthetic amenities and pedestrian safety hazards related to crime and traffic. Health outcomes include cognitive development, asthma, allergic sensitization, physical activity, obesity, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac arrest. Dr. Lovasi is co-director of the Epidemiology and Population Health Summer Institute at Columbia University and the school wide Urban+Health Initiative.
2/4/2016
The Long-Term Consequences of Children's Health and Circumstances
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Janet Currie
Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Policy Affairs and Director, Center for Health and Wellbeing
Princeton University

Thursday, February 04, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Janet Currie is the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Director of the Center for Health and Well Being and Chair of the Department of Economics at Princeton University. Dr. Currie has made fundamental contributions to public policies affecting child health and well-being including the impact of early childhood intervention programs, health insurance expansions, public housing provision and nutrition programs. She has been in the forefront of efforts to examine environmental threats to children’s health. Her research has illuminated important socioeconomic differences in child health, an issue of growing concern given the widening income equality in the United States. She has brought attention to the long term effects of poor health at birth and in early childhood.
1/28/2016
Health Care Cost Institute: Goals, Achievements, and Aspirations
Brown Bag Seminar Series

David Newman
Executive Director
Health Care Cost Institute

Thursday, January 28, 2016, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
David Newman is Executive Director of the Washington-based Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI) established in 2011 as a non-profit, independent, non-partisan research institute dedicated to creating the United States’ most comprehensive source of information on health care costs and research on the drivers of escalating health care costs. Dr. Newman will discuss HCCI’s major research on costs and utilization trends with implications for delivery system reforms including those relevant to New Jersey. Prior to joining HCCI, Dr. Newman was a Specialist in Health Care Financing at the Congressional Research Service and served as a consultant to the Department of Health and Human Services, CMS, FDA, the U.S. Army and Navy, SAMHSA, HRSA, and the US Agency for International Development.
12/3/2015
Regulation of Craving
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Hedy Kober
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Department of Psychology
Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Yale University School of Medicine

Thursday, December 03, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Hedy Kober, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology and Director of the Clinical and Affective Neuroscience Lab at Yale University’s School of Medicine. Her research takes a cognitive-neuroscience approach to clinical questions and uses state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods organized around interrelated themes: craving, regulation of craving, substance use disorders, smoking cessation, treatment for substance use disorders, neural mechanisms of change, emotion regulation in psychopathology, emotion-cognition interaction and mindfulness and meditation. She will discuss her work on the regulation of craving, using behavioral and functional neuroimaging studies, meta analyses, and clinical trials to understand the psychological and neural basis of this construct, and comparing between cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based approaches.
11/19/2015
Exploring Transdiagnostic Vulnerabilities Underlying Cigarette Smoking and Anxiety Pathology: Preliminary Findings and Future Directions
Brown Bag Seminar Series



Teresa Leyro
Assistant Professor
IHHCPAR and Department of Psychology, Rutgers University

Thursday, November 19, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Teresa Leyro, PhD is an assistant professor in Clinical Psychology in the Department of Psychology at Rutgers University. Dr. Leyro is director of the Affective and Biological Underpinnings of Substance Use and Anxiety (ABUSA) lab. Her research takes a multi-method approach to identify underlying cognitive-affective and biological risk for cooccurring anxiety and substance use, with a focus on cigarette smoking/nicotine dependence. Methodologies to measure risk include self-report and behavioral indices (e.g., distress tolerance), as well as psychophysiological assessment of autonomic nervous system (e.g., cardiac impedance and heart rate variability) and HPA-axis function (e.g., cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA]). Her translational research program employs stress provocation paradigms in laboratory settings as a means to explore these relations. Dr. Leyro has also engaged in research on alcohol, marijuana and illicit substance use disorders, severe mental illness, and HIV/AIDS.
11/12/2015
The Changing Social and Genetic Landscape of Health and Marriage in the U.S.
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Dalton Conley
University Professor of the Social Sciences
New York University and Visiting Professor, Princeton University

Thursday, November 12, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Dalton Conley, PhD is University Professor at New York University and holds faculty appointments in NYU's Sociology Department, School of Medicine and the Wagner School of Public Service. He is a visiting Professor at Princeton University and he also serves as an Adjunct Professor of Community Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and as a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER). Dalton’s research focuses on the determinants of economic opportunity within and across generations. He studies sibling differences in socioeconomic success; racial inequalities; the measurement of class; and how health and biology affect (and are affected by) social position. In 2005, he became the first sociologist to win the National Science Foundation’s Alan T. Waterman Award given annually to a young researcher in any field of science, mathematics or engineering. He is a 2011 Guggenheim Fellow.
11/5/2015
Tobacco Addiction and Smoking Cessation in African Americans
Brown Bag Seminar Series

Jasjit Ahluwalia
Dean
School of Public Health, Rutgers University

Thursday, November 05, 2015, 12:00 pm-1:30 pm
112 Paterson Street, 1st floor conference room
Jasjit S. Ahluwalia, MD, MPH, MS, a nationally recognized researcher in the fields of health disparities and nicotine addiction in minority populations, became dean of the Rutgers School of Public Health in April, 2015. Previously he was professor of internal medicine and epidemiology at the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center where he was the founding executive director of the Office of Clinical Research. His primary research has focused on nicotine addiction and smoking cessation in African-American smokers by way of conducting clinical trials, secondary analysis, qualitative research and clinical epidemiology research. His research has extended to the role of menthol in quitting, pharmacokinetics of nicotine, pharmacogenetics and cancer biomarkers. He is also engaged in global health work with two active research projects in Mumbai and New Delhi, India. Dr. Ahluwalia recently completed his term as chair of the National Advisory Council for Minority Health and Health Disparities at the NIH.
Upcoming Events :
11/30/2017, 12:00 pm
CANCELLED-The Role of Education in the Transformation of Health Care
Sherine Gabriel
 
 
Event Information:
For more information on seminars and events sponsored by the Institute for Health, call our main number (848) 932-8413.